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We are re-opening Friday May 8, 2020. We are eager to get back to a routine.
That means we are seeing patients for routine eye exams again.

The “new normal” routine in a doctors office is explained below:

1) You will have your temperature taken with a non-contact thermometer and sent home if above 99.9.
2) You will be asked some screening questions about your health and recent travel habits.
3) Our waiting room is sparse. There is nowhere to sit. So don’t bring companions.
4) Bring a mask and wear it over the nose and mouth.

We will be constantly cleaning and disinfecting around you and in front of you.

You will not be uncomfortable and you will get a safe exam, so feel relieved.

Call 407-263-EYES, 407-263-3937

Be well,
Dr. Graham

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Home » Eye Health » Eye Exams » Common Tests » Puffer Test

Puffer Test

Most people who’ve had a comprehensive eye exam are familiar with the puffer test. A puffer test is what it sounds like: With your head resting in the chinrest of a diagnostic machine called a slit lamp, your eye doctor uses a puff of air across the surface of the eye to measure the intraocular pressure, “inside” pressure, of the eye.
 
High pressure is a key indicator of glaucoma, a series of eye diseases that attacks the optic nerve.

How does a puffer test work?

Puff tests are quick and largely without discomfort. You’ll look at a light inside the machine while your eye doctor blows a gentle puff of air across the surface of your open eye. A device called a tonometer measures the eye’s resistance to the air, and calculates your internal eye pressure.
This usually takes only a few moments, and while your eye might water slightly, the procedure is generally over before you know it!
 
A puffer test is a part of glaucoma testing, and is a routine part of a comprehensive eye exam. Glaucoma is a serious disease of the optic nerve, and often doesn’t present itself until vision becomes impaired—that’s why it’s so important to have a puffer test to measure your intraocular pressure.
 

 Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!